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  1. Driven to Succeed

    My name is Adam – I’m 24 years old and have been blind since birth. Since the fall of 2016, I have worked at Mercedes-Benz of Boston and in the corporate office for Herb Chambers, a company with 56 dealerships that sell and service a wide variety of foreign and domestic vehicles across New England. The dealership where I work in Somerville, Massachusetts, is one of three Mercedes-Benz dealers in the Herb Chambers group. I have been interested in cars since I was in preschool. I have always been curious…

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  2. Blindness Isn’t Me

    Hello I’m Casandra, better known as CaspHer. I was born in Miami and grew up in Massachusetts. I’ve lived with blindness and deafness my entire life. Most people would assume that I couldn’t do much – but once they’ve spent twenty minutes with me, they realize that I am more than capable. I am an assistive technology trainer for the deafblind and seniors in Massachusetts. I enjoy teaching technology and seeing people succeed. My background was not in blindness at all. In fact, it was in fine arts. I realized…

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  3. Meeting a Coworker who is Blind

    Starting a new job is riddled with emotions. Current employees are curious if the new employee will fit into the office culture, and wonder how the new employee will react in certain situations. The new employee is excited about starting a new chapter in life, but may feel uneasy while deciding if this is the best career move. Just prior to the new employee’s arrival, current employees learn that their new coworker is visually impaired. How does this realization change a coworker’s perspective? I have been blind since birth, and…

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  4. Disclosure of Blindness During the Job Search

    Upon graduation from college in 2006, I was faced with finding a full-time job. Fellow graduates were in the same situation; everyone frequently talked about the type of company they thought they wanted to work at, and details about the jobs being considered. I was also faced with another hurdle to overcome: disclosing blindness to a potential employer. Research indicates that Americans fear blindness more than any other disability. Therefore, when a hiring manager learns that a candidate is blind, uncertainty, fear and a feeling of trepidation sweep over them….

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  5. Lessons Learned from the Story of Gennet Corcuera

    My grandmother lost sight in one eye due to an accident when she was only 18 years old. And this has made me aware, since I was born, of the difficulties and barriers that people with reduced vision have to face – and the effort required for a person who is disabled to do daily, basic things such as reading, walking, or cooking, just to name some examples. My mother, who suffered from sudden and permanent hearing loss in one ear after surgery, has also given me insight into what it means to…

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  6. Unseen Obstacles Ahead, but Tapping Out a Positive Future

    Here is a cocktail napkin version of my story. I had excellent vision until the age of 34, never wore glasses. My world started getting darker, and moving objects suddenly disappeared from sight – not good when driving. My initial academic goal was to get a Bachelors in Information Technology (IT). Life hands you a lemon, make some lemonade. I changed my major to Psychology. The brain and the mind for me were analogous to computers and software, just a little more complex. Earned my B.A. in Psychology with a…

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  7. Growing Up Blind in the 1940s – and How I Learned to Read as an Adult

    Growing up, I went to Catholic school in the 40’s. In first or second grade, the nuns asked the kids to open up a book and read. I opened up the book, but the print was too small to read the page. So I had to put my head very close down to the page in order to read it. A nun grabbed my neck and told me to stop goofing around and to read the book. But I couldn’t see it, so I put my head down again. The…

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  8. Can You Miss What You’ve Never Had?

    Recently I received an e-mail from a good friend named Jean asking a legitimate question, to which I promised a thoughtful response. She knew I had visited Sweden a couple of years ago, and she asked how I enjoyed the trip without the ability to experience it visually.  Her inquiry prompted me to ponder my own blindness and how I approach life. I dislike the cliché, “a person cannot miss what he/she has never had”.  It implies that I as a person with congenital blindness somehow lack the capacity to…

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  9. Blindness has been a positive experience for me

    In May 1972 when I was 10 years old as I ran along the bottom of my school playground in Derry, Northern Ireland, I was shot and blinded by a rubber bullet fired by a British soldier.  Despite losing my sight in such a traumatic way, I was able to bounce back very quickly.  I returned to the school that I attended prior to being shot, went on to university, I am married with two children and have had a very active and fulfilled life.  Where blindness has had its…

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  10. John, my husband the woodworker

    My husband John Furniss has been blind since the age of 16. He adapted to being blind very quickly physically and has always had great spacial awareness. Most days I forget he’s blind. He is a kind and gentle soul, not to mention incredibly talented. He’s a piano rebuilder and artistic woodworker. He doesn’t let his blindness stop him from doing all the things he loves doing. He mows our lawn and chops wood. He loves target shooting, sculpting and baking bread. John and I do blind awareness talks at…

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