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  1. BlindNewWorld’s Top 10 Assistive Tech Innovations in 2017

    2017 was a big year for assistive technology for the blind and visually impaired. While some products are still in development, it’s exciting to see so much in the works! We’ve compiled 10 of our favorite tech advancements from the last year. Which ones are you most excited about?     Wayband by Wear.Works This wearable device guides users to a specified location using vibration. The Wayband helps the visually impaired navigate the world unassisted, and it was used during the New York City Marathon for the first time in…

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  2. Building the World’s First Multiple-line Braille E-Reader

    There is a perception, especially amongst sighted people, that Braille is yesterday’s format. Printed Braille books are cumbersome and expensive, and after all, more and more books are being released in audio format. For many sighted people, the only contact with Braille is on elevator signs or the keys of an ATM. That perception, however, would be incorrect – and here’s what we’re doing about it. Research tells us that blind people who can read Braille are significantly more likely to be employed. Indeed, in the UK, many blind people…

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  3. Raising My Blind Daughter in India

    My daughter is blind. She is also funny, cuddly, silly, a lover of music, and has the cutest laugh. Her blindness isn’t the first thing I think about when I am asked about her. It is a part of her, but not something that defines her. We live in India and tend to stand out wherever we go; the white woman dressed in Indian clothing with the brown 4-year old holding a cane. It frustrates me when people wait until I look to the side, and then rush to snap…

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  4. Disclosure of Blindness During the Job Search

    Upon graduation from college in 2006, I was faced with finding a full-time job. Fellow graduates were in the same situation; everyone frequently talked about the type of company they thought they wanted to work at, and details about the jobs being considered. I was also faced with another hurdle to overcome: disclosing blindness to a potential employer. Research indicates that Americans fear blindness more than any other disability. Therefore, when a hiring manager learns that a candidate is blind, uncertainty, fear and a feeling of trepidation sweep over them….

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  5. Lessons Learned from the Story of Gennet Corcuera

    My grandmother lost sight in one eye due to an accident when she was only 18 years old. And this has made me aware, since I was born, of the difficulties and barriers that people with reduced vision have to face – and the effort required for a person who is disabled to do daily, basic things such as reading, walking, or cooking, just to name some examples. My mother, who suffered from sudden and permanent hearing loss in one ear after surgery, has also given me insight into what it means to…

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  6. Sharing Information with My Listeners

    I’ve been a volunteer for WXXI Reachout Radio, a radio reading service in Rochester, New York, for over 30 years. Yes, thirty years! For the past few years, I’ve hosted a show of my own called “Enabled,” a weekly program designed to take a deep look into services, products and issues affecting people with vision loss. We’ve covered topics ranging from adaptive technology and audio descriptions to art history and election rights. In doing my research for this program, I have learned so much, which I have happily shared with the…

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  7. Why We Read, and How We Write

    Twenty years ago this month, our global imaginative landscape was enriched when the first book of the Harry Potter series was published – and those of us so inclined found a new world to escape to. As an avid reader and a passionate writer, I’ve enjoyed sharing my enthusiasm for it with readers of all ages and backgrounds. I’ve been part of online forums about the Harry Potter universe, and I recently published my second novel, Before the Tide, which is a work of fan fiction, telling the story of…

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  8. Unseen Obstacles Ahead, but Tapping Out a Positive Future

    Here is a cocktail napkin version of my story. I had excellent vision until the age of 34, never wore glasses. My world started getting darker, and moving objects suddenly disappeared from sight – not good when driving. My initial academic goal was to get a Bachelors in Information Technology (IT). Life hands you a lemon, make some lemonade. I changed my major to Psychology. The brain and the mind for me were analogous to computers and software, just a little more complex. Earned my B.A. in Psychology with a…

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  9. The Difference Between Them

    I just happened to come across the BlindNewWorld campaign and I loved hearing the call for creating opportunities where the sighted and the blind can socialize with each other. I am an artist working in West Palm Beach, Florida. I am not blind, but as I am getting older I am finding myself depending on a stronger prescription for my glasses. This has had me thinking about different ways we communicate and how technology has been changing our lives. I have created several art projects using social media text words…

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  10. Spectacular BeSpecular

    The number one wish that all blind people have is to be as independent as possible in our daily tasks. Tasks that may seem simple to a sighted person can be next to impossible for a blind person without seeking help. Reading the label on food stuffs, without unnecessarily opening and spoiling the contents, for example, can be so frustrating. No matter how many times I ‘will’ my sense of smell to tell the difference between the contents of two cans, there is always a 50% chance I will open…

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