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  1. Dance Beyond Boundaries

    I open my eyes but see nothing. I feel the smooth marley floor under my feet and gently move my toe over the tactile marker on the ground. The music begins to play, and light begins to flood my field of vision. For a moment, I am disoriented. I take a few steadying breaths and begin to move. I trust my body. I trust my knowledge of the stage. I allow my proprioceptive instincts to carry me; these instincts let me know how far and which direction I move. With…

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  2. A Mom, Memes and an Innovative Way to Raise Money for Assistive Tech

    Braille literacy is so important to visually impaired kids and yet it can be prohibitively expensive to get books in braille. This is a real problem for my two bookworms Hannah (10) and Daniel (7). They were born with Leber’s congenital amaurosis and therefore blind from birth. Not having the same access to books as other children is a real frustration for Hannah especially. She now has grand plans to open a Braille bookstore in the nearby mall so that kids and people like her can get access to Braille…

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  3. Eyes Free Sports: Scoring Big Doesn’t Require Seeing

    “Pow!” This is the sound heard when my aluminum baseball bat strikes an oversized softball that beeps. I quickly drop the bat and run toward first base as fast as my legs can carry me. I slide into the buzzing base a split-second before the fielder can get me out. “Yes!” I exclaim, knowing I’ve just scored a run for my team. This might sound like an ordinary softball game with some odd beeps and buzzes involved. It’s anything but that. The above description is an example of myself playing…

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  4. Blind Sprinter: Setting Records and Aiming for the Paralympics

    My name is Karlee and I am a 17-year-old blind sprinter in the sport of Track & Field. I compete for my state New South Wales, and I have also represented Australia. Since starting two years ago when I was 15, I have broken many Australian records in the 100m, 200m, 400m, and 800m events. I was born with Lebers Congenital Amaurosis and Macular Coloboma – two eye conditions that resulted in me being classified as legally blind. When I was younger, I could see colour, light and shadows, as…

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  5. A Look Back at 2018: These Are the Stories of the #BlindNewWorld

    2018 has been another incredible year in the BlindNewWorld. We love hearing – and sharing – your stories of adventure, triumph, love, family, learning and so much more. These stories are what keep us going – and what keep our community strong. And we don’t want you to miss a single one of them. So to close out the year, we’re bringing together the full collection of 2018 #MyBlindStory posts. Get to know each and every one of the people who have shared their stories with us this year. And…

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  6. When It Comes to Demanding Access, Take the Big Swing

    I am a 14 year old blind skier, horseback rider, cross-country runner, Challenger Little League baseball player, singer, musician, voiceover artist, radio personality, advocate, student lobsterman and geek supreme from a small fishing village named Beals Island, Maine. Oh, and one more thing you should know, I’m a huge Boston Red Sox fan! I was born totally blind from a rare genetic condition known as Leber’s congenital amaurosis (LCA); because of this, I’ve been thrown lots of curveballs in my life. I’ve been bullied in school to the point of…

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  7. Why I Learned to SEE: Set Extraordinary Expectations

    My three children, two sons and a daughter, are typical teenage kiddos. They go to public school. They play sports. They have friends. They often stay up too late, keep their rooms quite messy, and talk back to me every now and again. Yep, pretty typical. But my kiddos also each have a certain, not-so-typical aspect that makes them, well, them. Many people describe my children as extraordinary. But I don’t. High achievers? Yes. Resilient? You bet. But extraordinary? No. However, it is my expectations for them and their expectations…

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  8. Learning Through Love

    Vicky is our four-year-old girl and she is losing her sight due to a rare genetic condition called Leber Congenital Amaurosis. And I would like to take a moment to thank her. I have redrafted this post many times, writing and rewriting all the little things I thank Vicky for. No words seem to capture all emotions and feelings. The truth is simple: I want to thank Vicky for what she’s teaching us. When you hug me strongly and tell me “Mummy, I love you sooooooo much,” you are teaching…

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