skip to main content
  1. Raising My Blind Daughter in India

    My daughter is blind. She is also funny, cuddly, silly, a lover of music, and has the cutest laugh. Her blindness isn’t the first thing I think about when I am asked about her. It is a part of her, but not something that defines her. We live in India and tend to stand out wherever we go; the white woman dressed in Indian clothing with the brown 4-year old holding a cane. It frustrates me when people wait until I look to the side, and then rush to snap…

    Read More
  2. An Early Arrival

    It is amazing when you hear a miraculous story over and over again how ordinary it becomes. It is like a song that is played repetitively on the radio – you can’t wait to hear it, but then it is requested constantly so it doesn’t seem quite as special anymore. I cannot count the number of times I have heard about my birth. It was told to me so many times that I almost believe I was there to experience the whole thing as an observer! I was born premature,…

    Read More
  3. Inclusion

    I’m a mother to my 17-year-old daughter. She lost her sight 3 ½ years ago to a brain tumor. I have watched her work hard to gain the physical skills necessary to function independently in a sighted world. I have watched her learn and practice the reading and technological skills necessary to participate in school and future professions. The hardest thing to watch is her social struggles. She can do her part, but it requires another willing participant to have a conversion, let alone a relationship. I saw BlindNewWorld and…

    Read More
  4. Being a Kid is Dangerous…

    I just read that blindness is the third most feared physical condition after only cancer and AIDS. I’m blind, but I’m not scared. Most blind kids aren’t scared. I’m sure that number would be completely different if you only surveyed those with blindness. However, fear is a pretty powerful thing. And feeling the fear of others – parents, relatives, teachers, and friends – can be very limiting for a blind kid. I had a conversation last year with a well-respected leader in the blind community. He is in his 70s…

    Read More
  5. Blind Motherhood: What Parenting Without Sight Really Looks Like

    Throughout much of my 20’s, I battled breast cancer. Chemotherapy and radiation impacted my body in ways I never expected, including effecting my vision. Beginning at age 28, my eyesight began to decline. First it was my color vision, then my depth perception. Doctors attributed my vision loss to a neurological disconnect; my brain was having problems communicating with my optic nerves. On January 3, 2012, I woke up and headed to my job as a social worker at a local school. Throughout the day, I developed a horrible headache….

    Read More
  6. Just keep swimming: A Paralympic Hopeful

    Blind people can do anything sighted can. Just because I am visually impaired doesn’t mean I can’t be active and participate in sports. I can horseback ride, ski, ice skate, play soccer, ride a bike, and swim. I may need some accommodations but I can still do all these fun things. Being blind to me means that my eyes just don’t work as well, but it doesn’t stop me from being active! My favorite is swimming. I started swimming on a USA Swim team when I was 7. I fell…

    Read More
  7. Back To School in a BlindNewWorld

    Another school year is here and parents and teachers alike are looking for school supplies. For visually impaired students, this list can come with a few extra supplies on it. But what kind of supplies do they need? How do these supplies differ from the supplies of a sighted classroom?   Whether you’re a teacher making a more inclusive classroom or a parent sending their child off to school, here are 7 supplies that can assist blind students on their road to knowledge.     1.Braille Readers As you would…

    Read More
  8. Why a supportive community is so important for special needs kids

    A couple years ago we took Ivan to his very first parade. The parade route was just a couple blocks away from our house, so the walk there was easy and of course if he hated it, we could make an easy escape too! Ivan was eight years old at the time and even then (as now) everything for him was a balance. As a child who is completely blind with additional physical and cognitive disabilities, we want to expose him to as many experiences as possible, but we don’t…

    Read More
  9. Seeing blindness through a mother’s eyes

    I don’t have anyone who is blind in my immediate life. Blindness is not something I typically think about and rarely come across.  The only time I ever see someone who is blind is usually when I’m visiting a major city or walking through an airport.  That’s when I see someone with a cane or a guide dog.   All of that changed when I became friends with a woman who has a son born blind, a handsome 6 foot plus young man now in his sophomore year at college. Her…

    Read More