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  1. Insensitive: My Humorous and Insightful Journey with Sight Loss

    For the past 12 years I have experienced sight loss through macular degeneration. When the pandemic hit last year, I found myself with time on my hands and decided to journal my journey with this life challenge in the form of a podcast called Insensitive. So I have been busying myself with the latest episode. Ahh ha, now I’ve got your attention haven’t I? A podcast! When I was in my early 40s, I started having difficulty with my sight. I have had high myopia (severe near-sightedness that, if left…

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  2. A Mom, Memes and an Innovative Way to Raise Money for Assistive Tech

    Braille literacy is so important to visually impaired kids and yet it can be prohibitively expensive to get books in braille. This is a real problem for my two bookworms Hannah (10) and Daniel (7). They were born with Leber’s congenital amaurosis and therefore blind from birth. Not having the same access to books as other children is a real frustration for Hannah especially. She now has grand plans to open a Braille bookstore in the nearby mall so that kids and people like her can get access to Braille…

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  3. #MyBlindStory 2020: Reflecting on this year in the #BlindNewWorld

    What a year, huh? The good news is that, even with everything that’s happening out there in the real world, we have a strong, supportive community to help us keep it together and keep going here in the #BlindNewWorld. As always, we wanted to take an opportunity to reflect on and highlight all of the incredible stories that have been shared with us this year. 2020 brought us personal insight from artists, musicians, athletes, innovators, actors, scientists, content creators, professionals, bright young adults, chefs, rock-star parents – as well as…

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  4. A Bad Blind Moms Holiday Gift Guide

    Happy holidays, season’s greetings and all the other fa-la-la we hear this time of year. It’s been an interesting year. Between kiddos at home 24/7, working from home, a worldwide pandemic, and – oh, yeah, did we mention kiddos at home 24/7? – some of us may be a bit Grinchy. The Bad Blind Moms have your back. We are bringing you a gift guide to send to relatives, friends and, of course, significant others. With the help from the virtual mom squad, here’s a finely curated gift guide we…

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  5. We’re Bad Blind Moms and We Know It!

    I’m Stacy Cervenka – and I’m a Bad Blind Mom. From the moment I found out I was pregnant with my first child, I’ve pretty much been a hot mess. Between three complicated pregnancies, several years of 2 a.m. feedings, dragging the kids around on public transportation to endless school and community activities – all while working full-time – I don’t think I’ve had a decent night’s sleep in eight years. Also, the fact that my husband and I are both blind has not exactly made the journey more convenient….

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  6. A Lifelong Love of Sports Leads to Building Beautiful Lives

    My name is Bryce Weiler. I was born almost four months premature, and shortly after my birth – due too much light or oxygen in the hospital – I developed an eye condition called retinopathy of prematurity, which caused me to become blind. Today, I’m the cofounder of The Beautiful Lives Project, a nonprofit that helps people with disabilities across the United States live their dreams in sports, performing arts, visual arts, nature and more. A Lifelong Love of Sports… During my time at the University of Evansville from 2010 through…

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  7. Why Braille Books Matter – for Blind Kids and Sighted Kids

    My name is Jared. I was born blind with no useful vision. Today, I am employed full-time as a Senior Software Engineer – a job I couldn’t do if I hadn’t learned braille. I am also married and a father to two young children, both of whom are sighted. Because I can read braille, I am able to read them bedtime stories and pass along to them my love for the written word. My parents and teachers deserve much of the credit for my being braille-literate today. They insisted that…

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  8. Becoming a Bad Blind Mom (and Why it’s a Good Thing)

    When I was 22, my senses narrowed to four; and really, my sense of smell has never been that great, so, it became more like three senses. And crikey, what’s a girl to do? Several infections slammed my body simultaneously. I was expected to die, but as all my independent ladies can attest to, we tend to be survivors. Sitting among family and friends, I became a brave soul and was often eulogized. With raised brows, I said, “Sure,” and sauntered towards my future. The future was unclear, a bit…

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  9. Aniridia, Acceptance and Building the Live Accessible Community

    As a young, shy girl with a visual impairment, I felt isolated and alone in crowded school hallways. I questioned my worth and was surrounded by self-doubt. There are so many stories of blind people not only succeeding at life, but thriving – yet I felt ostracized, incapable, unaccepted and lost. I grew up with aniridia syndrome alongside my sister, father and grandmother – all of whom also had this hereditary condition. My brother was totally deaf, though fully sighted. My mom was the only one without a disability. I…

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  10. Blind, But Not Beaten

    At the age of around 18 months, my parents rushed me to the doctor after I fell down a flight of 30 steps. I was diagnosed as being blind as the result of a rapidly growing brain tumor. I had surgery and the tumor was successfully removed—I would live, but I didn’t escape unscathed. Besides being blind, I had no sense of smell, and no endocrine system, which meant that I had no thyroid, no adrenal function and the list goes on. It could have been much worse. It was…

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