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  1. The Difference Between Them

    I just happened to come across the BlindNewWorld campaign and I loved hearing the call for creating opportunities where the sighted and the blind can socialize with each other. I am an artist working in West Palm Beach, Florida. I am not blind, but as I am getting older I am finding myself depending on a stronger prescription for my glasses. This has had me thinking about different ways we communicate and how technology has been changing our lives. I have created several art projects using social media text words…

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  2. Spectacular BeSpecular

    The number one wish that all blind people have is to be as independent as possible in our daily tasks. Tasks that may seem simple to a sighted person can be next to impossible for a blind person without seeking help. Reading the label on food stuffs, without unnecessarily opening and spoiling the contents, for example, can be so frustrating. No matter how many times I ‘will’ my sense of smell to tell the difference between the contents of two cans, there is always a 50% chance I will open…

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  3. It Was All a Blur

    I sit at breakfast, listening to all my new friends talking happily around me and drinking their coffee, all such talented and compassionate writers I’ve come to know over the last few days of this writing workshop – but something is wrong. I am far from home and having the week of a lifetime, a transformative experience really, but I’m having one of my bad eye days and it’s only adding to all the emotions being here has brought to the surface. I cannot see the colours of this place,…

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  4. #MyBlind(Date)Story: Seeing the Museum from a Different Perspective – and Making a New Friend

    The first thing that hits me early in the morning on Saturday, March 11, is the temperature. Six degrees, despite the blue skies and bright sunlight. As I wait for signs of life from my stubbornly frozen car, the landscape around me comes into view: a world encased in ice from the snow and sleet that weekend. “How will my date navigate this hostile terrain?” a voice inside my head repeatedly asks. These thoughts are triggered by the fact that a stranger who is blind is scheduled to meet me…

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  5. Promoting Inclusion and Bringing About Social Change – One “Blind Date” at a Time

    On Monday, March 6, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker will issue a proclamation to establish March 6 – 11 as BlindNewWorld week – a time for all citizens of the Commonwealth to educate themselves about barriers to inclusion and commit to making our world a kinder, more inclusive place. Throughout the week, BlindNewWorld, along with our network of partners, will promote and celebrate new ways to think about inclusion in settings including employment, education, innovation and transportation – and highlight different ways the sighted population can be proactive about breaking down…

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  6. 7 Tips For Making Your Super Bowl Party More Inclusive

    Super Bowl Sunday is here! Time to break out the solo cups, hot wings, and foam fingers to cheer on your favorite team. Do you have someone with a visual impairment coming over this year to watch the big game? If you do here are some tips to help make your home more accessible and comfortable.   1.Describe Your Home. Some simple orientation will help your guest feel at home. Phrases such as “the living room has a couch on the left with a coffee table in front of it,”…

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  7. Blindness + Style = Confidence

    Prior to losing my sight, I used to think that when a person used a white cane, it meant they were totally blind (no light perception). I was wrong. The range of sight loss/blindness is enormous and differs greatly from one person to the next. Contrary to popular belief—after the acceptance of, and acclimation to sight loss—though life has significantly changed, for the most part we remain the same. With few exceptions, the things we loved and excelled at are still integral to who we are at our core. Transitioning…

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  8. Growing up blind in 1940s and how I learned to read as an Adult

    Growing up, I went to Catholic school in the 40’s. In first or second grade, the nuns asked the kids to open up a book and read. I opened up the book, but the print was too small to read the page. So I had to put my head very close down to the page in order to read it. A nun grabbed my neck and told me to stop goofing around and to read the book. But I couldn’t see it, so I put my head down again. The…

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