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  1. Mission: Live Life Fully, Make a Difference, and Redefine Possible

    With an amazing team of individuals, I am setting off as a blind cancer survivor the day after I graduate from college on May 22nd to climb the highest mountain in Africa, Mount Kilimanjaro. In the process, my team is working on raising $500,000 for charities and organizations that not only saved my life, but gave me the strength and the tools to start living again. I realize that the amount of support I had greatly contributed to my success, and I want to make sure children facing life threatening…

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  2. Thank you for helping us build a BlindNewWorld!

    One year ago, we launched BlindNewWorld with a specific mission: break down barriers to inclusion for blind and low vision people in the workplace, community and education. This year has been incredible. We started a movement among people ready to change the way they see blindness – and we have raised awareness by sharing so many of your stories. Here are just a few of the highlights: We created a community – and it keeps growing… We built a community of almost 75,000 followers and have reached 50 million people,…

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  3. Stand by Me RP

    My story began three years ago when, at the age of 38, I was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa. My life changed forever that day and it was the start of the biggest challenge my family had ever faced. Within the first week of my diagnosis I was declared severely sight impaired (legally blind) and lost my job after being told I’d never drive again. We were plunged in to debt and I fell in to a spiral of anxiety, depression and isolation as my sight began to decline rapidly. We…

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  4. Promoting Inclusion and Bringing About Social Change – One “Blind Date” at a Time

    On Monday, March 6, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker will issue a proclamation to establish March 6 – 11 as BlindNewWorld week – a time for all citizens of the Commonwealth to educate themselves about barriers to inclusion and commit to making our world a kinder, more inclusive place. Throughout the week, BlindNewWorld, along with our network of partners, will promote and celebrate new ways to think about inclusion in settings including employment, education, innovation and transportation – and highlight different ways the sighted population can be proactive about breaking down…

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  5. Blindness has been a positive experience for me

    In May 1972 when I was 10 years old as I ran along the bottom of my school playground in Derry, Northern Ireland, I was shot and blinded by a rubber bullet fired by a British soldier.  Despite losing my sight in such a traumatic way, I was able to bounce back very quickly.  I returned to the school that I attended prior to being shot, went on to university, I am married with two children and have had a very active and fulfilled life.  Where blindness has had its…

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  6. Why a supportive community is so important for special needs kids

    A couple years ago we took Ivan to his very first parade. The parade route was just a couple blocks away from our house, so the walk there was easy and of course if he hated it, we could make an easy escape too! Ivan was eight years old at the time and even then (as now) everything for him was a balance. As a child who is completely blind with additional physical and cognitive disabilities, we want to expose him to as many experiences as possible, but we don’t…

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  7. When is it OK to offer help? One blind woman’s perspective

    Ever since the Blind New World campaign began, I have really become aware of how people’s perceptions of blindness appear in my everyday life.  Some are very obvious.  Comments like “You are amazing!”, “I don’t know how you do it.” and frequently “I’m sorry.”  These emphasize that people simply cannot imagine life without vision. Tonight I experienced another form of reaction to my visual impairment.  Getting onto the subway with my Seeing Eye dog, a woman kindly offered me another person’s seat.  I smiled and said “No thank you, I…

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