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  1. The Braille Trail

    Born blind and growing up in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, hiking has always been a part of my life. As a small child, I recall climbing the mountains with the help of my white cane and picking berries. The sound of the creek, crickets, and sweet smell of honeysuckles were a familiar part of growing up. My family and friends have always described the beautiful scenery around me. What I enjoy most is the incredible fragrances, various textures, and sounds of the forest and how the seasons bring…

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  2. Promoting Inclusion and Bringing About Social Change – One “Blind Date” at a Time

    On Monday, March 6, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker will issue a proclamation to establish March 6 – 11 as BlindNewWorld week – a time for all citizens of the Commonwealth to educate themselves about barriers to inclusion and commit to making our world a kinder, more inclusive place. Throughout the week, BlindNewWorld, along with our network of partners, will promote and celebrate new ways to think about inclusion in settings including employment, education, innovation and transportation – and highlight different ways the sighted population can be proactive about breaking down…

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  3. My Mom Went Blind and My Life Began To Unwind

    Being 14 years old already sucks enough or at least I thought it did. Then throw in your mom going blind within a matter of 8 months…it was more than this young teenager wanted to deal with. Adding that into my melting pot of teenage problems, I felt like my life was beginning to unwind. I say problems in a loose fashion because in all reality there weren’t big problems, but to a fourteen year old girl they were. It was the end of the world if I didn’t get…

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  4. A Lesson in Courage

    I came from a family that was uncomfortable with differences. I was made to feel inferior by all of them. My husband was the first person who showed me that it was OK to be me and that I was someone with value. He couldn’t see me and told me I was pretty. He was smart and did so many things on his own. I thought if he can, so can I. I am the happy wife of Jerry who is blind and has Parkinson’s. He has taught me to…

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  5. 7 Tips For Making Your Super Bowl Party More Inclusive

    Super Bowl Sunday is here! Time to break out the solo cups, hot wings, and foam fingers to cheer on your favorite team. Do you have someone with a visual impairment coming over this year to watch the big game? If you do here are some tips to help make your home more accessible and comfortable.   1.Describe Your Home. Some simple orientation will help your guest feel at home. Phrases such as “the living room has a couch on the left with a coffee table in front of it,”…

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  6. As long as I trust and believe, I can accomplish anything

    I was sighted my entire life, until at the age of 27, I lost all of my eyesight from diabetic retinopathy. I was a single mom, working to support my family, and now I lost my site in a matter of three months, lost my job and could not see to do anything. I felt like my life is over and that my only option was giving up. I could not have been more wrong. This is not the end of my life, but rather the beginning to an incredible…

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  7. Change can be beautiful

    Change has always been hard for me, no matter how big or small. In fact, a few weeks ago, my husband switched out the living room rug with the one that was in our bedroom. Once I made the discovery that he did this, I immediately told him that I didn’t like this change. But change is my reality due to Usher Syndrome. Usher Syndrome is a condition that is characterized by hearing and vision loss. I have moderate to severe hearing loss, but it has been stable my whole…

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  8. What do I use braille for in 2017?

    I started to learn braille when I was only a toddler. By the age of four and a half I entered school being able to read and write uncontracted braille. I then progressed onto grade 2 (contracted braille) and the maths and science codes. Braille was the foundation of my education. It enabled me to access books, to participate in the classroom and to write down my ideas. I was an avid reader, and braille opened up many worlds to me. I have talked extensively about the impact braille has had…

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  9. When I look in the mirror

    If you’re really curious about this photo, keep reading! My name is Nysha, I’m 25 years old, I have a retinal disease called Stargardt’s and this is what I see when I look in the mirror.  Stargardt’s is a juvenile form of macular degeneration characterized by a slow and progressive loss of central vision.  For many of us, we begin to loss our vision very slowly at first.  Then we might experience a period of more rapid vision loss.  Eventually, it is expected that our vision loss will plateau.  I…

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  10. Blindness + Style = Confidence

    Prior to losing my sight, I used to think that when a person used a white cane, it meant they were totally blind (no light perception). I was wrong. The range of sight loss/blindness is enormous and differs greatly from one person to the next. Contrary to popular belief—after the acceptance of, and acclimation to sight loss—though life has significantly changed, for the most part we remain the same. With few exceptions, the things we loved and excelled at are still integral to who we are at our core. Transitioning…

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