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  1. Blindness + Style = Confidence

    Prior to losing my sight, I used to think that when a person used a white cane, it meant they were totally blind (no light perception). I was wrong. The range of sight loss/blindness is enormous and differs greatly from one person to the next. Contrary to popular belief—after the acceptance of, and acclimation to sight loss—though life has significantly changed, for the most part we remain the same. With few exceptions, the things we loved and excelled at are still integral to who we are at our core. Transitioning…

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  2. Growing up blind in 1940s and how I learned to read as an Adult

    Growing up, I went to Catholic school in the 40’s. In first or second grade, the nuns asked the kids to open up a book and read. I opened up the book, but the print was too small to read the page. So I had to put my head very close down to the page in order to read it. A nun grabbed my neck and told me to stop goofing around and to read the book. But I couldn’t see it, so I put my head down again. The…

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  3. BlindNewWorld Holiday Gift Guide

    Finding the right gift for that special someone can be hard, if they are visually impaired, it might make your shopping trip even harder. But not to worry. We have compiled 7 of our favorite gifts that are accessible and perfect for the techies, foodies, and fashion forward people on your list. Swap Socks  These perfectly mismatched socks are great for anyone on your shopping list this year. Swap Socks creates unique, fun, and eye catching designs that always go together no matter which two you put on. Each pack…

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  4. Matt Chao Blind Sailor

    A blind sailor? Those words sound like an oxymoron. Yet, for more than half his life, racing sailboats continues to be a challenge and passion. As the life-partner of Matt and his “shore support” aka: wheels for the past thirty plus years, we thought you might like to learn about his incredible story. While Matt uses his Seeing Eye Dog, Quill to get around town, since Quill hasn’t learned to drive, that’s my job. Matt and I met in Boston, ’cause his then canine partner, Josie was a chick magnet….

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  5. Blind Motherhood: What Parenting Without Sight Really Looks Like

    Throughout much of my 20’s, I battled breast cancer. Chemotherapy and radiation impacted my body in ways I never expected, including effecting my vision. Beginning at age 28, my eyesight began to decline. First it was my color vision, then my depth perception. Doctors attributed my vision loss to a neurological disconnect; my brain was having problems communicating with my optic nerves. On January 3, 2012, I woke up and headed to my job as a social worker at a local school. Throughout the day, I developed a horrible headache….

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  6. A proud mom’s perspective

    Well, I certainly have had my experience dealing with blind children.  When our daughter, Lynne, was born in 1953, within a couple of weeks we realized something was not quite right about her eyes.  We took her to the Doctor, and were told he would keep close of her, and he would see her at the six week checkup.  At that time, he told us he was not sure if it was a brain problem, or an eye problem.  We were referred to a specialist in Worcester, who told us…

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  7. Walking the sidewalk

    I just have to share something that happened to me today that brought a tear to my eye, but also put a big smile on my face. I was leaving Best Buy on York Road in Towson waiting for the light to change when I noticed a young blind man with a stroller and his young daughter beside him waiting to cross the entrance-way to the parking lot. The car in front of me had pulled out too far, blocking their path from the sidewalk. I was about to gesture…

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  8. Can You Miss What You’ve Never Had?

    Recently I received an e-mail from a good friend named Jean asking a legitimate question, to which I promised a thoughtful response. She knew I had visited Sweden a couple of years ago, and she asked how I enjoyed the trip without the ability to experience it visually.  Her inquiry prompted me to ponder my own blindness and how I approach life. I dislike the cliché, “a person cannot miss what he/she has never had”.  It implies that I as a person with congenital blindness somehow lack the capacity to…

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  9. Blindness has been a positive experience for me

    In May 1972 when I was 10 years old as I ran along the bottom of my school playground in Derry, Northern Ireland, I was shot and blinded by a rubber bullet fired by a British soldier.  Despite losing my sight in such a traumatic way, I was able to bounce back very quickly.  I returned to the school that I attended prior to being shot, went on to university, I am married with two children and have had a very active and fulfilled life.  Where blindness has had its…

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  10. John, my husband the woodworker

    My husband John Furniss has been blind since the age of 16. He adapted to being blind very quickly physically and has always had great spacial awareness. Most days I forget he’s blind. He is a kind and gentle soul, not to mention incredibly talented. He’s a piano rebuilder and artistic woodworker. He doesn’t let his blindness stop him from doing all the things he loves doing. He mows our lawn and chops wood. He loves target shooting, sculpting and baking bread. John and I do blind awareness talks at…

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